Tickets for the 2022 Boar's Head Festival

We encourage anyone from CUAA to the community to be involved in The Boar’s Head Festival. Join us by contacting Amanda Williams, Director of Theatre and Kreft Arts Programing, at Amanda.Williams@cuaa.edu.

What is the Boar’s Head Festival?

 

Each December, students, faculty, staff and community members come together to enact medieval Christmas traditions and the story of Christ’s birth in this moving spectacle. Beginning in 1978 through the vision of three Concordia professors—Paul Foelber, John Sturmfels and Quentin Marino—the Boar’s Head Festival has become a treasured memory for many. It remains a vibrant and living tradition as it continues to profess the wonder of the Christmas miracle.

Boars Head, 2017: Kings
Boars Head, 2017: Mary and Joseph
Boars Head, 2017

Boar's Head Festival donors

Donor support is needed to continue the tradition of the Boar’s Head Festival. Thank you for your consideration!

Sponsorship levels

  • Artistic Director: $5000 (Oscar and Keturah Haab Foundation)
  • King Wenceslas: $2500 (Mrs. Linda Sproul)
  • Lords & Ladies: $1000 (Church Extension Fund MI District)
  • Wise Men: $500 (Mr. Robert and Mrs. MaryBeth Jackson, Mrs. Jean Schramke, Mike Cottone)
  • Angel Gabriel: $250 (Rev. Martin and Mrs. Karen Hagenow)
  • Beefeaters: $100 (Mr. William and Mrs. Mary Schott-Gift)
  • Shepherds: $50
  • King’s Page: $25
Church Extension Fund Logo

 

Give online here, or mail a check payable to CUAA, 4090 Geddes Rd, Ann Arbor, 48105

Questions?

Contact Linda Sproul via phone: 734-995-7491, or email: linda.sproul@cuaa.edu.

A brief history of the Boar's Head Festival

While the tradition of the Boar’s Head Festival dates back to the 14th century in England, the actual symbol of serving boar can be traced to ancient Roman times when boar was the preferred dish at great feasts. In medieval England, Christians considered the wild boar to be a ferocious beast and a symbol for evil. They adapted the Roman feast custom of serving a boar’s head on a platter to represent the triumph of the Christ child over evil.

Dr. Paul “Doc” Foelber

Dr. Paul “Doc” Foelber

Dr. Paul “Doc” Foelber

Dr. Neil Skov

In 1963 CUAA; originally "Concordia Lutheran Junior College", hires Dr. Paul Foelber as its first choir director. None of what follows would have happened without this genesis event. By 1978, Dr. Foelber, professor John Sturmfels, and professor Quentin Marino join forces to begin the Boar’s Head Festival tradition at CUAA.

 

The Boar’s Head fever spreads through the campus and community, making it one of the best-loved traditions in CUAA history. Through the years, more than 65,000 people have attended the festival. In 2018, after 40 consecutive years and more than 140 consecutive performances, Dr. Neil Skov, emeritus professor of science, retires from the role of Good King Wenceslas. He hand-picks Jonathon Neuendorf to take over the role.

Dr. Paul “Doc” Foelber

Dr. Paul “Doc” Foelber

Photo credit: Primatum, Prof. Marilyn Beyer, faculty editor.

1963

CUAA (known at its founding as Concordia Lutheran Junior College) hires Dr. Paul Foelber as its first choir director. None of what follows would have happened without this genesis event.

1978

Foelber, professor John Sturmfels, and professor Quentin Marino join forces to begin the Boar’s Head Festival tradition at CUAA.

Some background: “While the tradition of the Boar’s Head Festival dates back to the 14th century in England, the actual symbol of serving boar can be traced to ancient Roman times when boar was the preferred dish at great feasts. In medieval England, Christians considered the wild boar to be a ferocious beast and a symbol for evil. They adapted the Roman feast custom of serving a boar’s head on a platter to represent the triumph of the Christ child over evil.”

1979 - 2017

Boar’s Head fever spreads through the campus and community, making it one of the best-loved traditions in CUAA history. Through the years, more than 65,000 people have attended the festival.

2018

After 40 consecutive years and more than 140 consecutive performances, Dr. Neil Skov, emeritus professor of science, retires from the role of Good King Wenceslas. He hand-picks Jonathon Neuendorf to take over the role.

2020

The Festival takes a one-year hiatus due to the scourge of the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in much wailing and gnashing of teeth. It is the first time the event has been canceled in its history, but Concordia’s Choir recorded 25 minutes of the most beloved numbers from the Boar’s Head Festival for enthusiasts to still enjoy from home during the Christmas season.